TOOLS

Calling in Sick

Calling in Sick

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Taraneh Fazeli / Sick Time with Canaries
Info: Transfer drawing made at Project Row Houses on Sunday May 22, 2016, using Dennis Oppenheim’s Two Stage Transfer Drawing, 1971 as a score.
Training: Calling in Sick
Facilitator: Taraneh Fazeli/Sick Time with Canaries
DIY Ruin & Ladder Chairs

DIY Ruin & Ladder Chairs

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Caroline Woolard
Info: 2016, turned poplar, oil, felt, ten pieces at 18in x 16in x 16in each & steel, foam, upholstery, graphite, felt, 14" x 27" x 96"
Training: None at this time
Facilitator: Caroline Woolard
Extrapolation Factory

Extrapolation Factory

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Chris Woebken and Elliott Montgomery
Info: dimensions variable
Training: Operator's Manual for Context X
Facilitator: Extrapolation Factory
I Can't Breathe

I Can't Breathe

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Shaun Leonardo
Info: dimensions variable
Training: I Can't Breathe
Facilitator: Shaun Leonardo
Protocol

Protocol

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: The Order of the Third Bird
Info: dimensions variable
Training: Attention Lab
Facilitator: Order of the Third Bird
Protocol

Protocol

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Ultra Red
Info: dimensions variable
Training: Practice Session 1 with Ultra-red Practice Session 2 with Ultra-red Practice Session 3 with Ultra-red
Facilitator: Ultra-Red
Protocol of Attention and Adaptation

Protocol of Attention and Adaptation

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Leonard Nalencz
Info: dimensions variable
Training: Protocol of Attention and Adaptation Project 404
Facilitator: Project 404
Stages

Stages

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: Scrap wood, game board, card table, gray. Used to stage object lesson choreographies.
Training: Analogical mapping and indirect procedures: a brief survey of working methods
The Braid

The Braid

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Adelheid Mers
Info: dimensions variable
Training: The Braid - conversations about practicing
Facilitator: Adelheid Mers
Tools for Telling Time

Tools for Telling Time

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: altered architectural findings used to choreograph wordless didactics for The Hairy Blob of History, an examination of artists’ conceptions of time, curated by Adelheid Mers, Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, 2012.
Training: Analogical mapping and indirect procedures: a brief survey of working methods
Facilitator: Judith Leemann & Kenneth Bailey, Design Studio for Social Intervention
Untitled (Caedere)

Untitled (Caedere)

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: 2016, Altered hobby findings Created for WOUND as a field for attracting and surfacing rules.
Training: Analogical mapping and indirect procedures: a brief survey of working methods
Wordless Didactics

Wordless Didactics

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: dimensions variable
Training: Analogical mapping and indirect procedures: a brief survey of working methods
attention exercise

attention exercise

Tool Type: In Use
Made by: Linda Montano
Info: "Look in the left eye of partner. Be comfortable. Touch hands or knees. Focus on eye, yet remain open or global while doing it. Tell results to class."
Training: Art / Life Counseling
#155 from Income's Outcome

#155 from Income's Outcome

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Danica Phelps
Info: Pencil, watercolor, gouache, and recycled US currency on paper on wood 15 3/4 in tall x 9 in wide
Training: None at this time
Celeritas

Celeritas

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Matthew Buckingham
Info: 2009, Screened letters on a chalkboard enclosed in a wooden cabinet illuminated by natural or artificial light 27 x 22 x 4 inches / 68.6 x 55.9 x 10.2 cm Edition of 5
Training: None at this time
Chapter Four

Chapter Four

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Chloe Bass
Info: It's amazing we don't have more fights. An investigation of how we tell stories through the proximity and distance of two bodies in space. Medium: two publications, bathroom installation, workshops, and film (forthcoming).
Training: None at this time
Par Course A

Par Course A

Tool Type: On View
Made by: taisha paggett and Ashley Hunt
Info: This station consists of three mirrors, upon each of which is drawn the outline of parts of a body in a certain gesture.
Training: None at this time
Preposition and Prosthesis

Preposition and Prosthesis

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: 2013, found and made objects, Used to choreograph wordless didactics for Resonating Bodies, an examination of the participatory in large-scale sculpture, curated by Shannon Stratton, Soap Factory, 2013.
Training: None at this time
Proposal

Proposal

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Dave McKenzie
Info: 2007, Acrylic on canvas, 16” x 16”, #7 in an ongoing series
Training: None at this time
Question Piece

Question Piece

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Yoko Ono
Info: 1962, courtesy of Yoko Ono
Training: None at this time
Rehearsing the Birth of Tragedy

Rehearsing the Birth of Tragedy

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: 2014-present, Found and made objects, Used to study relational expressions of power, training, habit, and the unspoken as carried by familial and national legacy.
Training: None at this time
Rose Window

Rose Window

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Paul Ryan and Luis Berríos-Negrón
Info: 1:3 scale-model/prototype for dOCUMENTA 13, 48" by 46", hand-spun alpaca, hand-dyed and woven in Peru, 2010-12. In the collection of Core-Collaborator Jean Gardner.
Training: None at this time
Screen Forms

Screen Forms

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Judith Leemann
Info: 2014, Altered found objects. Used for a live performance alongside a lecture on the subject of virtuality and physicality by Kelly Kaczynski. College Art Association conference, Chicago, 2014.
Training: None at this time
Threeing Stick

Threeing Stick

Tool Type: On View
Made by: Ryan Paul
Info: hand painted wooden dowel, Courtesy of the collection of Core-Collaborator Jean Gardener.
Training: None at this time

TRAININGS

FACILITATORS

Adelheid Mers

From Düsseldorf, Germany. MFA Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Additional study University of Cologne, University of Düsseldorf and University of Chicago. Associate Professor, Dept. Chair, Arts Administration and Policy, School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Lives in Chicago, IL, USA.

Adelheid Mers engages in conversations with lay and professional cultural producers about their aesthetic practices. She uses diagrams as tools for figuring, to make cultural ecologies accessible to reflection, with an emphasis on practitioner perspectives. As a tenured professor of arts administration and policy at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Mers appraises cultural processes across scales and manifold participant's interests. As a visual artist, she draws on the performative tools of studio critique to facilitate conversations. Formally, diagrams are defined by their operativity, engendering action and reflection. Mers' diagrams are deployed across media, ranging from quick sketches to freely distributed flyers to manipulable whiteboards; occasions are created for use and response.

Mers works independently, with artists, and with non-profits and their constituencies. She has explored artist's thinking about grant application processes for the 3Arts Foundation, and conducted research on cultural ecologies on Chicago's south and west sides, with the Foundation for Homan Square and the University of Chicago. As part of an ongoing project, Art Work (Visual Art/Music/Management) Mers is currently exploring the practices of sound artists, composers and experimental musicians, in collaboration with colleagues at the Institute of Cultural Management at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna. Her work is presented nationally and internationally, through conference contributions and exhibitions. She has curated thematic exhibitions, published essays on pedagogy, arts administration and art-based research and has edited and published a book, Useful Pictures.

Honors include grants from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the British Council, the NEA, Illinois Arts Council and DCASE. Mers serves on editorial boards, and has recently served as juror for the NEA and the Rauschenberg Foundation.

Mers works with artists and with non-profit clients: with the City of Chicago Mayor's office and department of Innovation and Technology she observed stimulus funding application and uses. She has worked with the Evanston Art Center seeking out local arts ecologies, explored grant making impacts on artists for the 3Arts Foundation and conducted projects on Chicago's south and west sides, with the Foundation for Homan Square and the University of Chicago. Her work is presented nationally and internationally, at conferences and exhibitions. She has curated several exhibitions, published essays on pedagogy, arts administration and art-based research and has edited and published a book, Useful Pictures. Honors include grants from the German Academic Exchange Service, the British Council, NEA, the Illinois Arts Council and DCASE.

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Caroline Woolard

Caroline Woolard makes art and institutions for the solidarity economy. Her method enjoins objects to their contexts of circulation. She builds sculptures for barter only as she also co-creates international barter networks that continue to grow; she fabricates model Shaker housing and she also co-convenes organizers of community land trusts. Her multi-year, collaborative projects include OurGoods.org (2008-present); TradeSchool.coop (2009-present); and BFAMFAPhD.com (2014-present). She is a lecturer at the School of Visual Arts and the New School, a project manager at the worker-owned design firm CoLab.coop, and is a member of the Community Economies Research Network, and the board of the Schumacher Center for a New Economics. Her work will be featured in Art21’s New York Close Up documentary series over the next three years. http://carolinewoolard.com

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Extrapolation Factory

The Extrapolation Factory is an imagination-based studio for design-led futures studies, founded by Chris Woebken and Elliott P. Montgomery. The studio develops experimental methods for collaboratively prototyping, experiencing and impacting future scenarios. Central to these methods is the creation of hypothetical future props and their deployment in familiar contexts such as 99¢ stores, science museums, vending machines and city sidewalks. With this work, the studio is exploring the value of rapidly imagined, prototyped, deployed and evaluated visions of possible futures on an extended time scale.


The Extrapolation Factory has worked with partners and organizations such as Autodesk Research, UNICEF, TED Active, Museum of Arts and Design, Eyebeam, Storefront for Art and Architecture, Columbia University’s Studio-X NYC, Z33 Hasselt, The Royal College of Art, NYU’s ITP Program, Parsons The New School for Design, SVA’s Products of Design, The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Ontario College of Art and Design, Forum for the Future and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The Core77 Design Award granted to The Extrapolation Factory in 2013’s Speculative Design category and the Extrapolation Factory was nominated for the Design Museum’s Designs of the Year award in 2015.

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Judith Leemann & Kenneth Bailey, Design Studio for Social Intervention

The Design Studio for Social Intervention is dedicated to changing how social justice is imagined, developed and deployed here in the United States.  It functions as a creativity lab for social justice work in the public sphere. The Studio is a space where activists, artists, academics and the larger public come together to imagine new approaches to social change and new angles to address complex social issues. They also design social interventions that engage populations in imagining and designing new solutions to social problems. 

Kenneth Bailey: started his activism in the early eighties as a teenager, working in his neighborhood for tenants’ rights and decent housing, targeting the St. Louis Housing Authority. He went on to work for COOL, a national campus-based student organizing program, and then moved to Boston where he worked for the Ten Point Coalition, Interaction Institute for Social Change, and Third Sector New England, as well as being on the Board for Resource Generation. Most recently he has been a trainer and a consultant, primarily on issues of organizational development and community building.

He first realized the need for a more “designerly” approach to community work while developing parts of the Boston Community Building Curriculum for The Boston Foundation. This workshop asked community activists and residents to think about creative ways to work with their community assets – existing social relationships, individual’s gifts and skills, and untapped local resources. Many community residents remained locked in conventional nonprofit approaches to working with community assets. They weren’t obliged to, they just knew no other way. He realized then that activists needed new tools to redesign approaches for community change, which led him to build a design studio for social activism.

Judith Leemann: is an artist, educator, and writer living in Boston. Moving ideas and approaches across the boundaries separating distinct arenas of professional practice, she studies the effects of the movement on both that which crosses the boundary and that which is crossed into. This might look like finding ways to translate studio teaching methodologies into other contexts and to interrupt classroom habits by bringing in carefully curated noise. It might look like reading aloud, an ongoing distributed audio work produced every spring in which texts are stripped of citational armor and fitted into recursive loops of almost-story. Or it might look like object lessons, attempts to develop form languages for behaviors, made as wordless didactics for others’ exhibitions, as experimental narratives for activists, and as autonomous choreographic works. From 2009-2012 Leemann served as Artist in Residence at the Design Studio for Social Intervention and continues to think, work, and present alongside members of the studio. This longer-term work proceeds through the careful tending of parallel interests in the role of formal thinking in a social justice context, and in a free examination of indirect procedures for surfacing and articulating systems understanding. Leemann holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is Associate Professor in Fine Arts 3D/ Fibers at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. www.judithleemann.com

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Linda Montano

Linda M. Montano, a seminal figure in contemporary feminist performance art, has been actively exploring her art/life since the mid 1960s. Her work investigates the relationship between art and life through intricate life altering ceremonies, some of which last for seven or more years. She is interested in the way artistic ritual, often staged as individual interactions or collaborative workshops, can be used to alter and enhance a person's life and to create the opportunity for focus on spiritual energy states, silence and the cessation of art/life boundaries.

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Order of the Third Bird

There remains some confusion about the history and practices of the body known at The Order of the Third Bird, but evidence points to its having been for some time a loose network of cell-like groups (together with a penumbra of apostates and splitters) that engage in ritualized forms of sustained attention to made things—generally to works of art in the traditional sense. The canons of secrecy around these activities—their structures and purposes—have traditionally been sufficiently restrictive as to leave some doubt as to wether any individual professing knowledge of the Order could in fact be genuinely associated therewith.

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Project 404

It is high tide in the digital age. Smartphones, laptops, tablets, televisions, and now watches and other “wearable technology” constantly proffer text and images, often simultaneously. We can scroll or swipe our way through the waves of rich data, but there is always another hyperlink to transport us elsewhere.

If we are to accept the presence of digital technology in our lives, we need strategies and practices that will ensure that we remain active, not lulled into passivity by these devices. Project 404 is a practice of attention that aspires to help us remain fully, creatively engaged with the world and ourselves while using the very devices that threaten us with passivity.

The practice itself consists of two phases: a silent phase of fifteen minutes during which the participants look intently together at a single image, chosen from among the images submitted by the people in the group; and a colloquy phase of between 60 and 90 minutes, during which the participants discuss their experiences of the silent phase.

Project 404 rests on the belief that it is practice, more than theory, that makes us who we are. Our practice of attention can be informal and social as well as pedagogical; in either case, it is designed to enable us to be more fully attuned to the infinitely complex nexus of external stimuli and interior consciousness that is our human being, and it allows us to enjoy collaborative sociability, as we discuss with one another the experience of paying focused attention to our devices and the images they display.

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Shaun Leonardo

Shaun Leonardo uses his body to communicate and portray imagery, in this case, hyper-masculine images of physicality – at the expense of his own physical comfort. The function of the male body has long been a signifier of self-worth. The body affirms and legitimizes his feeling of control and agency over his environment. In this sense Shaun “El C.” Leonardo is performing two very distinct actions at once. On the one hand, he uses performance as a venue for discussion of how men have internalized culture’s preconceived notions of how men should act and appear. And on the other hand, his performances call attention to how these expectations are not only strange, but also not applicable to the rest of men at large. We are not all super heroes, that these spectacles of masculinity contain elements of absurdity and arbitrariness. Leonardo’s work calls our attention to these spectacles not for their immediate content but rather as symbols of our cultural acceptance of an arbitrary and potentially irrational masculine norm.

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Taraneh Fazeli/Sick Time with Canaries

Canaries is a network of women, femmes, and gender non-conforming people living and working with autoimmune conditions and other chronic illnesses. The group name references “canaries in the coal mine”—shorthand for those whose sensitivities are early indicators of adverse conditions in the environment. Canaries functions both as a support group with monthly meetings, a listserv of 90+ members, and an art collective. While not all of its members are artists, many are painters, actors, and writers whose somatic experiences exceed interpretation by biomedical discourse and come together to build shared language and exchange strategies for coping with and learning from their conditions.

 

"Sick Time, Sleepy Time, Crip Time: Against Capitalism’s Temporal Bullying" is Taraneh Fazeli’s ongoing curatorial project which brings together artists, disability activists, and other practitioners doing work on the body to consider the states of debility, rest, and disability (particularly their temporalities) as potentially resistive to capitalism and other forces of oppression. Grappling with the so-called “off-tempo” body that won’t efficiently labor, “Sick Time” considers how the leaky and porous body in states of debility can provide new possibilities for collectivity, privileging interdependency while also negotiating and maintaining difference through radical kinship and forms of care. “Sick Time” is structured in multiple nodes including workshops, a study group, publications, performances, and exhibitions, the first of which is at Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts this coming March.

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Ultra-Red

Activist art has come to signify a particular emphasis on appropriated aesthetic forms whose political content does the work of both cultural analysis and cultural action. The art collaboration Ultra-red propose a political-aesthetic project that reverses this model. If we understand organizing as the formal practices that build relationships out of which people compose an analysis and strategic actions, how might art contribute to and challenge those very processes? How might those processes already constitute aesthetic forms?

In the worlds of sound art and modern electronic music, Ultra-red pursue a fragile but dynamic exchange between art and political organizing. Founded in 1994 by two AIDS activists, Ultra-red have over the years expanded to include artists, researchers and organisers from different social movements including the struggles of migration, anti-racism, participatory community development, and the politics of HIV/AIDS.

Collectively, the group have produced radio broadcasts, performances, recordings, installations, texts and public space actions (ps/o). Exploring acoustic space as enunciative of social relations, Ultra-red take up the acoustic mapping of contested spaces and histories utilising sound-based research (termed Militant Sound Investigations) that directly engage the organizing and analyses of political struggles.

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VISIT

Hours: 8am to 7pm on weekdays and 9am to 6pm on weekends.
Location: The Commons Brookyln, 388 Atlantic Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11230.

Email: info@woundstudycenter.com

ABOUT

WOUND aims to mend time and attention by providing (1) practice spaces for groups, (2) a study center for sculptural tools, and (3) trainings in practices of listening, attention, and collaboration.

Staff

Interim Director: Caroline Woolard, caroline@woundstudycenter.com
Curator: Stamatina Gregory, sgregory@cooper.edu
Assistants: Emilio Martinez Poppe, Jordan Delzell, Anna Vila, Anna Zinovieff Papadimitriou, and Samantha Rosner
General Contact: info@woundstudycenter.com

Mission

WOUND aims to mend time and attention by providing (1) Practice Spaces for groups, (2) a study center for practice-related readings and sculptural Tools, and (3) accessible Trainings in practices of listening, attention, and collaboration.

(1) Practice Spaces: Just as dancers take classes throughout their lives, WOUND aims to become a permanent practice space for group work in the visual arts.

(2) Study Center: The study center at WOUND holds a collection of small objects, writing, and ephemera used in group work. WOUND focuses on relational, rather than autonomous, objects.

(3) Trainings: If democracy is an endless meeting and socialism requires too many evenings, then WOUND cultivates behaviors that might allow groups to gather together more carefully. 

History

2013: Caroline Woolard conceives of the study center for group work and begins writing grants and speaking with possible partners to open the center in New York City.

2015: Stamatina Gregory and Saskia Bos invite Caroline Woolard to bring the study center to Cooper Union in 2016.

2016: The study center opens for the first time at 41 Cooper Gallery from October 13 - November 18th, 2016. The study center is featured in Artforum, Art in America, and The New York Times.

2017: The study center moves portions of the collection to the solidarity economy meeting space at 388 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn known as the Brooklyn Commons. Portions of the collection will travel to Providence, Rhode Island. Portions of the collection travel to Dakar, Senegal.

Quotations

WOUND Director Caroline Woolard (caroline@woundstudycenter.com) gives the following four reasons for founding this study center:

PEDAGOGY: This study center is a demonstration of the future of art school. Art departments will be the places where interdisciplinary teams are formed, utilizing practices of listening, attention, and collaboration that this study center honors.
 
AESTHETICS: This study center makes impossible the fantasy of an autonomous object, removed from collective practice and historical context. Every object in the study center is called a tool, and is either "on view" or "in use," in trainings by collectives and politically engaged artists.
 
SOCIAL PRACTICE: How can an exhibition or short term project engage a community in a transformative manner? Social practices are long term; they must be practiced. Just as dancers take classes throughout their lives, WOUND aims to become a permanent practice space for group work in the visual arts.
 
DEMOCRACY: If most New Yorkers have no experiences of democracy at work, at home, in school, or online, how will we learn to work together? This study center provides a practice space for joint work and joint decision making. 

Membership

To support WOUND, please become a member. Yearly membership is offered at a sliding scale, from $20 - $200, based on what you can afford. Members are notified of trainings before the general public, have access to tools on member-only days, and enable us to continue to provide trainings to the public. Please write to info@woundstudycenter.com if you would like to become a member.

Future Locations

We are always seeking short and long term space for our collection of tools and our training programs. WOUND is also seeking spaces that can host facilitation and training. For inquiries regarding travelling the study center’s collection, or to offer a space to WOUND, please email info@woundstudycenter.com.

Press

The New York Times

"Wound” also shows how the art world’s breakneck schedule of exhibitions, fairs and biennials undercuts the ability of socially engaged artists to develop long-term strategies and practices. In this sense, the project works within the time-bound exhibition system while pushing back against it.

- Martha Schwendener, The New York Times 

Artforum

 "The word wound is one of the English language’s most powerful and contradictory homographs. As a noun it means bodily damage, a rending of the flesh or psyche; and as the past participle of wind, to have twisted something up. Artist Caroline Woolard defines her social-practice project WOUND, started in 2013, as the latter—like what one does to a clock. And yet “Mending Time and Attention,” an exhibition and a series of workshops organized by WOUND, seeks to heal the pain inflicted by late capitalism’s compartmentalization and commodification of time."

- Wendy Vogel, Artforum

Art in America

 "When artists create opportunities for support and mutual aid rather than unquestioningly competing with one another for meager resources, they open a small space of resistance to the divisiveness that comes from an economically precarious existence. The brainchild of Caroline Woolard, a sculptor and social-practice organizer who has initiated various barter-based endeavors in New York, and curated by Stamatina Gregory, this group exhibition with work by seventeen artists and collectives is meant to be the first incarnation of Wound, a membership-based study center whose name suggests the activity of setting a clock. Attention and time, two things atomized by digital technology, are the focus of the objects displayed on the walls and tables and in the vitrines."

- Cathy Lebowitz, Art in America

 

References

Leemann, Judith – Reading Aloud https://archive.org/details/HairyAboutTheHeel

Shahjahan, Riyad - Being 'Lazy' and Slowing Down: Toward decolonizing time, out body, and pedagogy

Lightman, Alan – Einstein’s Dreams 

Thompson, EP  –  Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism

Martin, Randy – A Derivative Sociality

Ingold, Tim – What is a Tool?

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Stamatina Gregory and Cooper Union for making this project possible. Thanks also to Jennifer Monson, Aaron Landsman, Risa Shoup, Abigail Statinksy, Alicia Boone Jean-Noel, Pascale Gatzen, Robert Sember, and Athena Kokoronis for introducing Stamatina Gregory and Caroline Woolard to artists, designers, dancers, and facilitators. This project would not be possible without ongoing conversations with Leigh Claire La Berge, Louise Ma, Or Zubalsky, Susan Jahoda, Emilio Poppe, and Pedagogy Group members.

The ladder furniture and stacking column stools in the study center were designed by Caroline Woolard and built by ironworkers Julia Helen Murray, Neva Kocic, and Yvonne Castellanos, and woodworkers Sean Slemon and the American Wood Column Company. The desk and chair were designed and built by Nightwood. This website was designed by Rosen Tomov and Caroline Woolard and built by Or Zubalsky.

WOUND is supported by a generous grant from the Rubin Foundation and from Cooper Union.

Rubin Foundation Logo

 

COLLABORATIVE TIME

WOUND

/waʊnd/  mending time and attention

 

Listening and looking are forms of artistic attention. Collaboration requires both. What kinds of listening and looking are provoked by contemporary artworks? How can we develop capacities of listening and looking that enable us to become more nuanced critics and practitioners of collaborative work? WOUND starts with the premise that certain practices and tools can offer an experience of collaborative time, a time which is specifically marked by our engagement with one another.

 

WOUND is a study center for practices of listening, attention, and collaboration. In its month-long installment at The Cooper Union, WOUND director Caroline Woolard worked with curator Stamatina Gregory to select tools from artists and collectives whose multi-year practices register in the visual arts. In its online archive, WOUND will present a full spectrum of tools, facilitators, and practices from the performing arts, speculative design, community organizing, geography, and engineering.

 

Director Caroline Woolard calls WOUND, “a study center for the mending of time and attention.” WOUND makes a double claim on meaning. As the past participle of the verb to wind, “wound” reaches back to a past that has seemingly been set in motion. And yet, as a present participle of the same verb, as seen, for example, in the phrase “the clock is wound,” the verb indicates a potentiality that can be altered, it indexes a conclusion that is not foregone. Nonetheless, when most visitors first see the word W-O-U-N-D, they will make an association to the much more common noun form: a wound, as in a harm or an injury.

 

Perhaps the current injury on view at WOUND is in thinking that time has been wound against our desires: there is “too little time”; time moves “too quickly,”; our time has been attenuated. WOUND asks: How, through collaboration, can we unwind time in order to render it open, unspecified, and inviting? How can we recognize the nature of our seemingly dwindling attention not as the result of being “wound up,” but as the result of being hurt or injured, an emotional claim which, necessarily, implies the ability to be healed? Can these practices render time a qualitative not quantitative phenomenon, something that is marked and construed for groups through mutuality rather than received through authority?

 

To embody collaborative time, groups must learn how to gather, how to need and support one another, and how to tremble together. Dave McKenzie proposes that we “meet until we can’t, or won’t.” Chloe Bass measures the spatial distance of discomfort. Judith Leeman creates tools for nonverbal communication. The Order of the Third Bird and Project 404 build a musculature for sustained attention. Yoko Ono asks us to speak with questions only. Paul Ryan invites us to identify the subject-positions from which we interact. Linda Montano directs our gaze. Adelheid Mers provides a path for the drawings that often accompany dialog. The Extrapolation Factory builds a context in which imagining the future helps us to better understand the present.

 

Many of the practices presented in this study center acknowledge the deep hurt or wounds from which political action, artistic collaboration, and transformative organizing often begin. Ultra-red’s protocols emerged from HIV/AIDS organizing; Sick Time with Canaries’ practices began as a support group for artists with autoimmune conditions; Danica Phelps’ work developed as a response to her own precarity; taisha paggett and Ashley Hunt’s work unfolds from our current epidemic of mass incarceration; Shuan Leonardo’s I can’t breathe is a response to mass police-sanctioned violence against communities of color. These artists’ and groups’ practices are lifelong and acknowledge that wounds cannot be healed within the temporality offered by conventional art institutions.

 

This study center makes impossible the fantasy of an autonomous object, one removed from collective practice and historical context. Every object in the study center is called a “tool” and is either "on view" or "in use" in trainings by collectives and politically engaged artists. WOUND links a wide range of collaborative and participatory practices, from the so-called 1960s dematerialization of the art object (tool on view: Yoko Ono), to 1970s cybernetic systems (tool on view: Paul Ryan), to 1980s feminist durational performances (Linda Montano). The study center places practices of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s in conversation with artists and collectives of the 2000s who continue to emphasize collective practice by distributing texts, prototypes, and tools.

 

Time-keeping devices are always time-producing devices. Rather than understanding time as neatly divisible, linear, and disciplinary, as seen in the historical clocks and watchmaker’s tools from the National Watch and Clock Museum and the books on view from the New York Historical Society, the center studies how artists produce time through collaboration and collective action. Practice requires duration. Art departments and art institutions have increased funding for social practice since the early 2000s, but the communities that are rewarded within academic and non-profit spaces tend to be short-lived and outcome-oriented. Transformative practices cannot be developed or contained in a month-long exhibition, a four-year or two-year degree, or a year-long grant. Just as dancers take classes throughout their lives, WOUND aims to become a permanent practice space for group work in the visual arts. To move toward an aesthetic of practice, further study is required.



Written by Stamatina Gregory, Leigh Claire La Berge, and Caroline Woolard

 

The study center is open today thanks to curatorial work by Stamatina Gregory, creative direction and exhibition design by WOUND director Caroline Woolard, graphic design by Inessa Shkolnikov, web development by Or Zubalsky, study center assistance by Emilio Martinez Poppe, Anna Zinovieff Papadimitriou, Anna Villa, Jordan Delzell, Samantha Rosner, Emily Adamo, ironworkers Julia Helen Murray, Neva Kocic, Yvonne Castellanos, and woodworkers Sean Slemon, and Daniel Ramos.


Planning for WOUND began in 2013 and has been sustained by ongoing conversations between Caroline Woolard and Stamatina Gregory, Leigh Claire La Berge, Jennifer Monson, Aaron Landsman, Risa Shoup, Abigail Satinsky, Jon Hendricks, Athena Kokoronis, Lika Volkova, Colin McMullan, Huong Ngo, Christine Wang, Alicia Boone Jean-Noel, Pascale Gatzen, BFAMFAPhD members (Susan Jahoda, Emilio Martinez Poppe, Agnes Szanyi, Vicky Virgin), former OurGoods and Trade School co-organizers (Louise Ma, Or Zubalsky, Chisthian Diaz, Rachel Vera Steinberg, Aimee Lutkin, Rich Watts, Carl Tashian, and Jen Abrams), as well as Social Life of Artistic Property co-authors (Pablo Helguera, Michael Mandiberg, William Powhida, Amy Whitaker), and Pedagogy Group members (Maureen Connor, Susan Jahoda, Barrie Cline, Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz, Laurel Ptak, James Andrews, Shane Aslan Selzer, Robert Sember, Taraneh Fazeli, Mark Read, Sasha Sumner, Torkwase Dyson).

WOUND is pronounced /waʊnd/, as in: the clock has been wound.

Email info@woundstudycenter.com for more information, to suggest a future tool or training, or to offer a short term or long term space for the study center's collection of sculptural tools.